By this I don’t mean to put down technology and social media as ways to develop business, because we know they can and are effective at some level. But, it is still important to not forget those old fashion means of developing business that include face to face meetings, and my point of the day – handwritten “Thank You” notes.

Remember those times your mother drove you nuts with “have you thanked Aunt Betsy for that knitted sweater yet?” Maybe that is the cause for many people to have an aversion to thanking people for…..whatever. Or, they may thank them, but in the quickest and least painful manner possible. Unfortunately, they are passing up one of the most effective means of producing a real, favorable impact on their business.

I ran across an article on ProfitAdvisors.com on “How to Build Your Business with Thank You Notes” by accountant Michael Gray dated January 1999 (I luv that old stuff). His main points in my view:

“Customers want to feel important and appreciated. A key to build customer loyalty is to build a relationship with customers/clients/patients where they feel important and appreciated!

“In any business, but especially a business where there is contact with a customer and a representative of the company either in person or on the telephone, the best way I know to cement that relationship is through personal notes – thank you notes!”

He goes on to add that the envelope should be hand-addressed, and you should use a real postage stamp (vs. firm’s postage meter); and finally, if your handwriting is just horrible, at least sign the typed note in blue ink. All good points.

Gray learned all that at his mother’s knee, I’ll bet. So, pay attention to that maternal lesson when you thank clients for their business, or a referral source for sending same, or for the myriad of kindnesses extended by others.

Remember, do it the old fashion way, just like your mother taught you.

  • Couldn’t agree more. Never underestimate the power of a handwritten note. With the amount of email (and social media hits) we all get, something that arrives in the mail will definitely make an impression.

  • Ditto!
    I always recommend to our accountant marketers that they send handwritten, stamped thank you notes.
    I have gone to clients and prospective clients’ offices where my thank you card is in their manilla folder file or is standing upright on their desk.
    Yes, it takes time, but can have a favorable impact on the business relationship and differentiate you from the competition.

  • Just want to echo what the other have said. This is a great post and raises an important issue. People would be wise to take your advice.