For over 10 years here I’ve been pleading with firms to talk with their clients about how they’re doing. Whether the process was seeking realistic client feedback, or simply conducting a general client survey, the important thing is whether firms were doing it at all.  Most were not. It is critical in this day and age that they be doing so.

Most will not. So, why don’t I give up beating that drum.

Well, I have to thank Patrick Lamb for his post of Monday. In it he posed the rhetorical question whether “law firms need to have their institutional hearing checked.” He drew his question from the “2016 Report On The State All of The Legal Market” by Georgetown Law Center and Peer Monitor. And from it he drew to strong messages:

“1. More work is going places other than law firms.

“2. Law Firms keep raising rates. Clients refuse to keep paying.”

He also pointed out using graphs that while legal services are increasing – and oh, so are billing rates – realization rates (the amount of billings collected) is falling “precipitously.”

He then asks the hard question: “what does it all mean?”  Many clients are not satisfied!  Law firms will make more money by improving client service than by raising rates.  Lamb’s wonder about institutional deafness should resonant with more firms.

Does your firm need hearing aids?

 

P.S. There’s more worth reading in the Georgetown/Peer Monitor report.

 

 

If it wasn’t so darn important, I wouldn’t harp on the topic so much.  As I mentioned in my last post, I got to wondering how many posts I have made on this blog over the past 10 years that touched on the subject. As said there, I went to my trusty search box above and entered “client feedback.” Having preached over and over on the topic, I can’t really say whether I was surprised there were over 90 posts that referred to it.

Many of my readers may not have seen or been following my blog in those days, I thought it might be beneficial to revisit some of them. Seeking feedback has always been No. 3 on my list of Top 10 Marketing Tips from the beginning. So, here are three more posts on seeking feedback:

In-House Counsel Want Their Law Firms To Seek Feedback

More and more it seems that in-house counsel are expecting their law firms to ask for their feedback. Even though “most general counsel and consultants say those law firms (seeking client feedback) are still in the minority and there isn’t nearly enough of this type of dialogue going on” according to an article on Law.com’s…Continue Reading

Now, More Than Ever, Talk With Your Clients

Two recent surveys really point out how important it is for law firms to stay very close to their existing clients. Not only by communicating constantly, but seeking feedback on how the firm is doing. Why? Because clients, especially in-house counsel, continue to be concerned about the costs of outside legal services. As a result, both…Continue Reading

Why Some Client Feedback Programs Don’t Work

The good news is that some firms are doing client feedback programs; the bad news is that they aren’t really getting the feedback they need. That is, the feedback questions are superficial, and don’t really offer the kinds of return that will actually benefit the firm in retaining the client over the long haul. An…Continue Reading

Hopefully, these revisited posts will encourage you and your firm to seek feedback from your clients.

 

P.S. My apologies for some broken links in some of these posts.  I wasn’t able to repair them, but still believe they are worth sharing.

After seeing a couple of post in the last few days about client satisfaction, I got to wondering how many posts I have made on this blog over the past 10 years that touched on the subject. So I went to my trusty search box above and entered “client feedback.” Having preached over and over on the topic, I can’t really say whether I was surprised there were over 90 posts that referred to it.

Many of my readers may not have seen or been following my blog in those days, I thought it might be beneficial to revisit some of them. Seeking feedback has always been number three on my list of Top 10 Marketing Tips from the beginning. Here are a few:

Seeking Client Feedback: More Critical Than Ever

It’s been awhile since I harped on how important client satisfaction with their legal service provider is. Since starting this blog in January 2005, I have preached many, many times on how important feedback is for firms to retain existing clients or obtain referrals from them (See a few posts below on the subject).  It…Continue Reading

How to Seek Client Feedback

Well, 2015 is almost here. Time to plan your business development strategies for the coming year. One simple one (albeit a feared one by some lawyers), involves seeking feedback from clients to ensure (or improve) the quality of legal services provided. No one needs to be reminded of how tough and competitive the legal marketplace…Continue Reading

Client Feedback Pointer

Seeking client feedback is not only important for every law firm, but it needs to be done right. Following a recent post of mine on the topic, my friend Stacy West Clark raised some issues that got me to thinking about the Who, What, When, Why’s and How’s of getting client feedback: Who should conduct…Continue Reading

Seek Client Feedback For The Right Reasons

Although I believe that law firms will gain more work from clients because they seek feedback on how they are doing, that cannot be the reason for undertaking such a program. The honest reason for seeking client feedback must be based on caring for the client and the relationship. All else will take care of itself….Continue Reading

It’s been awhile since I harped on how important client satisfaction with their legal service provider is. Since starting this blog in January 2005, I have preached many, many times on how important feedback is for firms to retain existing clients or obtain referrals from them (See a few posts below on the subject).  It started with my Top Ten Marketing Tips posts; and ranked No. 3 on the list in terms of prominence when it comes to developing (and holding on to) business IMHO.

With the significant changes in the legal profession that have occurred since the “second” great depression, client feedback is needed even more now.  In fact, I should probably move it up to No. 2 on my list of best practices.

The topic has been mentioned in the Citi/Hildebrandt client advisory before, and it is again in the “2014 Client Advisory.” This year’s advisory addresses, under the topic of firm growth, three areas: organic growth, laterals and mergers.  And under organic growth, it covers the issue of client feedback and the interrelationship with cross-selling, to wit:

“In Citi’s 2013 Law Firm Leaders Survey (LexisNexis® subscription req.)…57 managing partners of predominantly Am Law (sic) 100 firms described how critical cross-selling efforts have become….(T)he survey also found that while a substantial number of firms have a formal client feedback program, the majority (53%) do not.”

Two-thirds of those that have a formal program talk with clients about cross-selling; and those who don’t often talk about price.  The advisory states that law firm clients more often ”talk about the importance of relationships with their firms.”

“Implementing a formal client feedback program is a key means by which firms can further cement their client relationships and capture greater market share.”

In today’s new world, it is important to solidify as many client relationships as possible in order to avoid reducing your firm’ market share.  Nah, more than that, it’s critical.

 

Client Satisfaction Surveys for Law Firms

How Satisfied Are Your Clients? Ask Them

Client Interviews: Think Defensively

Client Interviews: Why They Really Are Necessary