Some law schools are making inroads into an area woefully ignored for far too long. Earlier I did a post bemoaning the lack of training by law schools in preparing solos and small firms for the business side of the law, since so many lawyers (some 80% according to the new ABA President Michael S. Greco) fall into one of those categories. My focus was primarily aimed at the marketing side, but obviously there is much more knowledge required to set up and run a law practice.
Bruce MacEwen of Adam Smith, Esq. fame has a really great article on the missing course in law schools, and it is enhance by the comments he received in response. Several law schools are offering courses that should be helpful to their graduates with the business side of law. But, why aren’t more doing so?
Bruce isn’t the only one who has discussed this issue. Earlier Matt Homann over at the [non]billable hour had what he calls his “rant” on the same topic . Any law school deans out their listening?
Both articles are worth reading for a broader perspective on the issue. Small firms could definitely benefit by having new lawyers come with a skill set its partners had to learn the hard way.

  • I agree with your comments on the lack of business courses in law school. I’m not an attorney; however, I specialize in legal staff training & development. By far, the majority of problems they have in working with attorneys is the lack of business sense that many of them have, especially concerning managing staff and making (or refusing to make) a business decision.
    Keep up the crusade!